[Ebook] ↠ Where the Streets Had a Name Author Randa Abdel-Fattah – Dcrjservices.co.uk

[Ebook] ↠ Where the Streets Had a Name Author Randa Abdel-Fattah – Dcrjservices.co.uk chapter 1 Where the Streets Had a Name, meaning Where the Streets Had a Name, genre Where the Streets Had a Name, book cover Where the Streets Had a Name, flies Where the Streets Had a Name, Where the Streets Had a Name c5ab0dd19dca8 I Need To See Sitti Zeynab One Last Time To Know If I Will Have The Courage To Go Ahead With My Plan The Two Nurses Look Frazzled And Smile Wearily At Me We Must Leave Now, They Say In Urgent Tones I Won T Be Long, I Reassure Them And I Jump Up Onto The Back Of The Ambulance I Can Smell The Air Of Her Village, Pure And Scented I Can See Her Village As Though It Were Bethlehem Itself I Can Smell The Almond Trees Hear My Heels Click On The Courtyard Tiles See Myself Jumping Two Steps At A Time Down The Limestone Stairs I Can See Sitti Zeynab Sitting In The Front Porch Of The House I Only Have To Remember That Walk Through Her Memories And I Know I Can Make My Promise I Ve Already Lost Once I Refuse To Lose Again Stay Alive, I Whisper And You Shall Touch That Soil Again Thirteen Year Old Hayaat Is On A Mission She Believes A Handful Of Soil From Her Grandmother S Ancestral Home In Jerusalem Will Save Her Beloved Sitti Zeynab S Life The Only Problem Is The Impenetrable Wall That Divides The West Bank, As Well As The Check Points, The Curfews, The Permit System And Hayaat S Best Friend Samy, Who Is Mainly Interested In Football And The Latest Elimination On X Factor, But Always Manages To Attract Trouble.But Luck Is On Their Side Hayaat And Samy Have A Curfew Free Day To Travel To Jerusalem However, While Their Journey May Only Be A Few Kilometres Long, It May Take A Lifetime To Complete.


10 thoughts on “Where the Streets Had a Name

  1. says:

    The Middle East is such a rare setting to see in books for teenagers, and I found this to be such an interesting, intelligent and thought provoking book that also managed to be funny, despite such heavy content Hayaat was a likeable protagonist, and I really felt as I was reading her need to save her grandmother.I really enjoyed one of Randa Abdel Fattah s earlier novels Does My Head Look Big In This , which I think is a really wonderful book, but it is dramatically different from Where the str The Middle East is such a rare setting to see in books for teenagers, and I found this to be such an interesting, intelligent and thought provoking book that also managed to be funny, despite such heavy content Hayaat was a likeable protagonist, and I really felt as I was reading her need to save her grandmother.I really enjoyed one of Randa Abdel Fattah s earlier novels Does My Head Look Big In This , which I think is a really wonderful book, but it is dramatically different from Where the streets had a name which seems to me amature novel, even though the central character is younger It s such a real novel to me, it felt as Hayaat and her family could really exist There is so much about politics and history in this book, but it never seems forced It s fascinating and heart breaking at once.Where the streets had a name is definitely a book that I would love to see being studied in schools, or at least on some recommended reading lists So often you see on the news things that are occurring in the middle east, and it s so impersonal most of the time, not really a thing you think about forthan a moment or two and I think Where the streets had a name shows the reality of life in a warzone, and it s such a touching and outstanding novel A must read


  2. says:

    I might be a bit biased towards this one, because the story is set in Palestine, and I believe many of us, Muslim or not, have a soft spot for Palestine Being a children s book though, this was written in the eyes of 13 year old Hayaat, and is dotted with humour and childish naivety I also already love the Arab culture and Arabic language so I now know a fewwords like dabka, the folk dance, and ya zalami, which means oh man , etc.But on a serious note, I believe the author s intention w I might be a bit biased towards this one, because the story is set in Palestine, and I believe many of us, Muslim or not, have a soft spot for Palestine Being a children s book though, this was written in the eyes of 13 year old Hayaat, and is dotted with humour and childish naivety I also already love the Arab culture and Arabic language so I now know a fewwords like dabka, the folk dance, and ya zalami, which means oh man , etc.But on a serious note, I believe the author s intention was indeed to shed light on the Palestine Israel conflict, to bring out the things we might not know or even think about how life goes on during war people have weddings, children go to school, families need to go shop for groceries , the multi religious society Muslims, Christians, Jews , how there are good people in all religions and how prejudices and generalisations just do not work, injustice in the littlest and biggest things And I also like how the author portrays the family in this story, in particular the grandmother granddaughter and sister sister relationship Favourite quotes Feel as you wish that is your right But you will soon find that even hatred will not give you comfort It will only make you miserable Sitti Zeynab Once upon a time a fisherman went out to sea He caught many fish and threw them into a large bucket on his boat The fish were not yet dead, so the man decided to ease their suffering by killing them swiftly While he worked, the cold air made his eyes water One of the wounded fish saw this and said to another, What a kind heart this fisherman has see how he cries for us The other fish replied, Ignore his tears and watch what he is doing with his hands Raghib Your soul is strong, Hayaat Do not deprive the world of your soul and heart Justice will come when those who hope outweigh those who despair Hope is a force that cannot be reckoned with, ya Hayaat You will find a place for yourself in this world Sitti Zeynab


  3. says:

    Trigger warnings war and everything that goes along with it, death of a friend, PTSD For a book intended for young adults, this isINCREDIBLY political It s the story of a thirteen year old Palestinian girl growing up in the West Bank So, like, it was always going to be an incredibly political story But at the same time, I don t think it had really occurred to me just HOW political this was going to be It definitely doesn t paint Israel in a good light, and it s definitely pushing a Pale Trigger warnings war and everything that goes along with it, death of a friend, PTSD For a book intended for young adults, this isINCREDIBLY political It s the story of a thirteen year old Palestinian girl growing up in the West Bank So, like, it was always going to be an incredibly political story But at the same time, I don t think it had really occurred to me just HOW political this was going to be It definitely doesn t paint Israel in a good light, and it s definitely pushing a Palestinian perspective, which should come as no surprise to anyone given that the author is of Palestinian descent Most of the story takes place over a single day as the protagonist and her best friend try to make their way from Bethlehem to Jerusalem Along the way, they encounter roadblocks literally , people on both sides who go out of their way to help, and see how the other half live In some ways, it reminded me of The Hate U Give The protagonist has facial scarring as the result of an incident that killed her childhood best friend, and moving through the checkpoints and seeing certain things on her journey is very triggering for her I wanted adefinitive ending than I got, but given the political situation in which the book is set, it was pretty naive of me to expect a definitive ending It s not my favourite of her books, but it s definitely an interesting read that stabbed me right in the feelstimes than I anticipated


  4. says:

    When I was a child I had a very vague sense of global conflicts in other countries Because of my Bloom County comics I knew a bit about apartheid in South Africa Later as a teen I heard The Cranberries sing Zombie and eventually learned a bit about the troubles in Northern Ireland The Israeli Palestinian conflict, however, had a lousy pop culture PR department Nowhere in the whole of my childhood did I encounter anything that even remotely explained the problems there Heck it wasn t until When I was a child I had a very vague sense of global conflicts in other countries Because of my Bloom County comics I knew a bit about apartheid in South Africa Later as a teen I heard The Cranberries sing Zombie and eventually learned a bit about the troubles in Northern Ireland The Israeli Palestinian conflict, however, had a lousy pop culture PR department Nowhere in the whole of my childhood did I encounter anything that even remotely explained the problems there Heck it wasn t until college that I got an inkling of what the deal was Even then, it was difficult for me to comprehend Kids today don t have it much easier and can I tell you how depressing it is to know that the troubles that existed when I was a child remain in place for children today They do, however, have a littleliterature at their disposal For younger kids there are shockingly few books For older kids and teens, there are at least memoirs like Tasting the Sky A Palestinian Childhood by Ibtisam Barakat or Palestine by Joe Sacco What about the middle grade options Historically there have been a couple chapter books covering the topic, but nothing particularly memorable comes to mind Enter Where the Streets Had a Name by Randa Abdel Fattah Written by the acclaimed author of the YA novel Does My Head Look Big in This, Abdel Fattah wades into waters that children s book publishers generally shy away from Hers is the hottest of hot topics, but she handles her subject matter with dignity and great storytelling Hayaat was beautiful once That s what her family would tell you But since an accident involving the death of her best friend, she s remained scarred and, to be blunt, scared Hayaat lives in Bethlehem in the West Bank in 2004 Her family occupies a too small apartment and is preparing for the wedding of Hayaat s sister Jihan Unfortunately there are curfews to obey and constant checkpoints to pass When Hayaat s beloved Sitti Zeynab grows ill, Hayaat decides to put away the past and do the impossible She will travel to her grandmother s old home across the wall that divides the West Bank to bring some soil from in front of her old house With her partner in crime Samy by her side, Hayaat reasons that the trip is attainable as it s just a few miles What she doesn t count on, however, is the fact that for a Palestinian kid to make that trip, it may as well be halfway across the world Hayaat, however, is determined and along the way she s able to confront some of the demons from her past In a lot of ways this book is a good old fashioned quest novel You have your heroine, battle scarred, sending herself into a cold cruel world to gain the impossible That the impossible would be a simple sample of soil doesn t take anything away from the poignancy of her intent By her side is her faithful sidekick, and along the way she meets a variety of different people Some are bad, some are good, and all are human So it s a quest novel, sure, but it s also a family dynamics novel The story does a great job of making this an accessible novel to all kids so you believe in Hayaat s family through and through From her overbearing mother to her silent father to her grandmother, caught up in dreams and memories You care about these people You desperately want a happy ending for them Needless to say, if a person writes a book about Palestinians for kids, be it a picture book or a novel, it s going to be considered a contentious subject It s easy to avoid such subjects Most middle grade does Abdel Fattah is to be commended for her guts then Though her critics will try to find fault with her depictions of Israel, Abdel Fattah s restraint is remarkable There is a moment in this book when a curfew is in place and Hayaat peeks out at the streets at the Israeli soldiers patrolling there She notes how young they are and how they must have families somewhere That doesn t stop her from remembering how her best friend was killed with rubber bullets, of course Later we hear the tale from Hayaat s grandmother of how she lost her home When she and her husband went back, there were new residents living there Through a translator they hear how the woman s family died in the Holocaust and there s that moment of feeling simultaneous pity and horror and anger Regardless, one family has taken another family s home which is wrong and not a difficult thing to understand What Abdel Fattah does is continually show that everyone in this situation is human You ll see similar techniques when authors write middle grade novels about Jim Crow in the American South In those books you ll usually find one sympathetic white person in the midst of racists Similarly, this novel has Mali and David, two Israeli s who object to the situation in the Middle East and have returned from their new country of residence to try and change things Through their eyes you see that there is never a single way of thinking about something There are a lot of things I admire about this book but it s the humor I particularly respect This book is chock full of situations that are not funny Curfews are not funny Dehumanization of citizens is not funny But between these bad times are moments of levity You care deeply about Hayaat and her family and the little snatches of dialogue we get between characters can be telling At one point Hayaat s grandmother explains to her that husband was killed by getting run over by a car shortly after understanding that he d never be able to return to his home Hayaat interrupts by asking if he died of a broken heart Yes, of course it was, she says, looking confused And every other part of his body It was a big car There were a couple practical storytelling elements I would have changed, had I the power For example, the moment when Hayaat pours the Jerusalem soil over her grandmother s hands occurs on page 237 Yet we have a good seventy pages left to go at that point Admittedly, there s a lot of backstory to sum up There s Jihan s wedding and the street kid that convinces Samy that he might contain the key to getting out of this life Still, it was surprising to get past the most exciting elements of the book only to find everything was to be slowly slowly rectified Another thing I would have included was an Author s Note on the history of the region The book sort of makes the assumption that kids are already aware of the history of Palestine and what it has been through It assumes that they know why there are Israeli soldiers and checkpoints Even a map of the region would have been important, particularly if it showed the remarkably short route Hayaat and Samy attempt to take It would be interesting to hand this book to a kid who knew nothing about Israel Palestine and see how much they comprehend I suspect that this book would appeal to such kids with a yen for contemporary realistic fiction, but it would pair even better with taught units about Israel Palestine today Getting kids to care about children like themselves in other countries is difficult Getting kids to care about children in countries they may not have even heard of before is evendifficult Certainly this book pairs beautifully with Barakat s aforementioned Tasting the Sky Both books beautifully convey an untenable situation that cries out for resolution Abdel Fattah s book fills a massive gap in collections everywhere This is a book worth reading Hopefully lots of folks will For ages 9 12


  5. says:

    3.5 stars rounded up to 4 An effortlessly captivating style of writing, with the innocence of a 13 year old protagonist is what I like about this book makes its dark and heavy setting less intense Being exposed to our media, which shows only bombings, destruction and conspiracy when it comes to the Israeli Palestinian conflict, makes it very hard to imagine that in the West Banks, life goes on Tourists walk around, kids go to school, people throw weddings, dance Dabka, buy groceries and, well 3.5 stars rounded up to 4 An effortlessly captivating style of writing, with the innocence of a 13 year old protagonist is what I like about this book makes its dark and heavy setting less intense Being exposed to our media, which shows only bombings, destruction and conspiracy when it comes to the Israeli Palestinian conflict, makes it very hard to imagine that in the West Banks, life goes on Tourists walk around, kids go to school, people throw weddings, dance Dabka, buy groceries and, well, live their lives For me, the concept of acceptance among people of different ethnicities in a multi religious environment IN THE MIDDLE EAST, is very very difficult This book is one of the best children s book I ve read War is always better described from the point of view of a child, and the author has managed to add humor and life to the sad and dark themes of the book however, I could clearly distinguish between when Hayaat was talking and when the author herself took over, putting adult words in the mouth of a child, but there weren t many moments like this There was a lot of history in the book but it wasn t forced, it was natural and real Overall I enjoyed it very much and I thinkkids should have the opportunity to read it It made me want to visit Jerusalem so badly, but that s not possible, so, never mind Ugh


  6. says:

    What a great idea for a book This is about a Palestinian family living in the West Bank They have lost their land in Jerusalem, and to add insult to injury, they are forbidden to even go there since they are now green cards When 13 year old Hayatt s grandmother is rushed to the hospital, she decides to do something really special for her so she can regain her strength she will find a way to sneak into Jerusalem and retrieve some soil from her ancestral home Jerusalem is only 6 miles away, What a great idea for a book This is about a Palestinian family living in the West Bank They have lost their land in Jerusalem, and to add insult to injury, they are forbidden to even go there since they are now green cards When 13 year old Hayatt s grandmother is rushed to the hospital, she decides to do something really special for her so she can regain her strength she will find a way to sneak into Jerusalem and retrieve some soil from her ancestral home Jerusalem is only 6 miles away, but for Hayatt and her friend Samy, it is a far away and forbidden country, and indeed it is that difficult to penetrate They face soldiers with machine guns, flying checkpoints, The Wall, andFor these West Bankers, this is a way of life Hayatt likens her life to being confined to an open air prison Along the way she meets people with all kinds of opinions on the situation in Israel, even two Israelis fighting for peace between the people We finally find out what happened to Hayatt and it is a poignant moment I love when I find a book like this that really has the potential to make an impact on people A great middle grade novel, but just as great for teens and adults of all ages 5 stars, highly recommended


  7. says:

    Abdel Fattah leaves her familiar subject of ethnic Australia, and explores the characters of youths living in a troubled society in the Middle East However, this story, whilst tragic, is also very funny and uplifting, and celebrates the strength and hope that we can still gain through family, even in the harshest circumstances.


  8. says:

    There is no war in music A beautifully told nuanced story about family roots, hope, loss and life in the middle of a conflict Full review on the blog There is no war in music A beautifully told nuanced story about family roots, hope, loss and life in the middle of a conflict Full review on the blog


  9. says:

    Simply breathtaking That is all I can say.


  10. says:

    This book really took me by surprise I found the description only mildly intriguing but decided to give it a go anyway and I m really glad I did Hayaat s journey to Jerusalem is only a small part of this tale It s muchto do with family and friends and grief I thought Hayaat s family was very amusing and felt very real I enjoyed all of her conversations with her grandmother I liked how much she grew as a person throughout the book and that we got someinsight into her dad This b This book really took me by surprise I found the description only mildly intriguing but decided to give it a go anyway and I m really glad I did Hayaat s journey to Jerusalem is only a small part of this tale It s muchto do with family and friends and grief I thought Hayaat s family was very amusing and felt very real I enjoyed all of her conversations with her grandmother I liked how much she grew as a person throughout the book and that we got someinsight into her dad This book tackles many issues and does it well It s a fairly quick read and I really enjoyed it A unique story full of memorable characters